Author: Arienne

Blog Posts

I blog regularly on LinkedIn. Below are my latest posts, with links to the complete blog on LinkedIn.


Beware the HR Analytic Barbarians

June 1, 2017

“We have met the enemy and they are us” – Commodore Oliver Perry, 1813

I am truly impressed at the explosion of interest in HR analytics in recent years. It seems like almost every week there is another conference somewhere in the world where people come together to share war stories and compare best practices. The excitement about what people are working on and what might be accomplished is palpable, and I don’t want to be a buzz kill. However …

As I look across the landscape of what people are doing and talking about, I get a little nervous. My Ph.D. is in economics and I spent the first decade of my career working as a traditional labor economist. The models and frameworks I learned in graduate school and applied in my first job are very powerful and carry the potential to reveal very interesting things about how labor markets impact people’s jobs and careers.

Yet despite those interesting insights, economics is almost universally derided for trying to do too much with too little – and for good reason. The problem is that economists use woefully small amounts of data on workers and jobs to tell big stories about why things happen the way they do in the labor market. For example, Gary Becker won the Nobel prize for his theory and analysis of human capital. Yet that model considers only years of schooling and years of work experience because that’s all that was universally available at the time when he was doing his research decades ago. Though the field of labor economics has progressed in a number of ways, still today the basic human capital model of formal education and years of experience is a foundation of the way labor economists look at the world. Read the rest of the post here.


Winning the HR Analytics Arms Race

April 19, 2017

Cross posted from CIMS Innovation Management and co-authored with Alexis Fink

The results are in: Human resources analytics has won the battle in the court of public opinion and all companies know about HR analytics. Yet they still struggle to understand what to do with it.

In a recent survey of 528 chief human resource officers across the U.S., consulting company Evanta found that they rated “leveraging HR data and tools to create business solutions” their top priority, ahead of improving HR as a business partner, succession planning, workforce planning, recruiting, and diversity. Yet they rated “developing best practices for predictive analytics” much lower, at eleventh, behind all those.

Our conclusion? Most companies still struggle to get business insights from their HR data, and can’t yet focus on advanced analytics and prediction.

So how can companies win the analytics war? Every campaign is a series of battles. Here we provide advice for winning the initial skirmishes. The first step is knowing which analysts can best battle on your behalf. The second step is knowing how to deploy them to work most effectively with both the business and HR. Do both steps the right way and you’ll be well on your way to winning the HR analytics war. Read the rest of the post here.


High Performance Work Design Trumps Employee Engagement

April 6, 2017

People usually equate high performance with employee engagement. Yet engagement is not the same as productivity and performance. How engaged people are depends on the work design, and the work design itself can promote productivity separately from employee engagement. Individual ability also is a critical contributor. Together they are the three main contributors to job performance: state of mind, ability, and job design. Engagement refers only to the first, yet the other two are arguably more important, especially for sustained performance over an extended time.

In the short term, performance can be increased through greater effort. This is what people commonly call high performance: applying extra energy, time and persistence to accomplish stretch goals. Whether you’re running a 5-K race, juggling multiple deliverables or working late to meet a tight deadline, you have to make a conscience effort to do the best you can — or risk falling short of your goals. Discretionary effort like this is what a lot of people mean when they talk about employee engagement.

However, high performance cannot be sustained solely through persevering and extreme perspiration. Sustained high performance happens through the right combination of motivation (engagement), skills (competencies), and job design (role and responsibilities). Each of these three components must be aligned to achieve sustained high performance. Two parts — motivation and competencies — are familiar to everyone and need little explanation. The third part — job design — is equally important but receives less attention. Read more here.


Strategic HR Analytics Workshop

March 27, 2017

HR analytics is at a crossroads today. We have at our fingertips access to the most powerful computers, the largest databases on organizational processes, and ever-expanding information on consumer behavior and the way commerce is conducted worldwide. The number HR analytics articles, surveys and events proliferates while the depth of insights aren’t keeping pace. Organizations struggle as much as ever to achieve strategic objectives while HR strives to make effective decisions when dealing with tight budgets and competing business priorities.

Alexis Fink and I invite you to join us May 10-12 in San Francisco for a learning program on Strategic Analytics that provides tools and skill building to close the gaps. We show how to use analytics to make better strategic decisions and be a stronger business partner and leader. Together, we’ll learn how to:

  • Bring together the business and HR to effectively identify and solve systematic talent and business challenges
  • Analyze and decide when to focus on improving current HR practice, and when to rethink how everything fits together to support the business
  • Determine whether you can rely on the data you have at hand in your HR systems to make strategic decisions, or go out and collect different information
  • Identity where to find additional sources of data where needed
  • Forge your own path when benchmarks would lead you astray
  • Integrate analytics and influencing to get results

Specific examples from the participants’ current business, human capital and analytics challenges will be used throughout the workshop to demonstrate how to apply the Strategic Analytics approach, and determine what to do and what not to do. Whether you are a business leader, HR professional, or analyst, the workshop will help you make better business and human capital decisions, and direct the analytics conducted in your organization for more actionable insights.

Alexis and I jointly lead the workshop, combining our 35 plus years of working and consulting with organizations on how to optimize integrated talent management systems, total rewards, leadership and talent development, competency systems, HR and predictive analytics, strategic workforce planning, spans of control, team dynamics, organizational design, and matrix-based decision making processes.

The workshop provides participants with models and a process for conducting analytics that support improved organizational effectiveness and strategy execution. It incorporates the enterprise approach used by senior business leaders, and the human capital approach used by HR and frontline managers, which are usually applied separately and fail to find the root causes of organizational problems. The workshop shows how to integrate them for a comprehensive, systems approach to diagnosing the sources of strategy execution failure. The insights have direct implications for enterprise investment that can be used to inform annual planning and budgeting decisions.

Individuals and teams interested in using data and analytics to improve organization effectiveness and strategy execution should attend. The workshop is appropriate for HR professionals, analytics experts, function and unit leaders, line managers, and others involved with diagnosing and improving organizational effectiveness and strategy execution.

Click here for more details.


Talent is an organizational capability

August 23, 2016

Everyone knows what talent management means, right? Yet despite widely accepted common practice, most talent management approaches fall way short of the mark when it comes to improved strategy execution and organizational effectiveness.

When we talk about accomplishing business objectives and achieving strategic success, the talent that’s embodied in people plays a critical role: without the contributions of individuals, nothing would ever happen. Yet this traditional way of defining and focusing on talent leaves a gaping hole in what we need to know: there are other major components of work design that must be included to optimize organizational performance and achieve strategic success. No one is an island, and that applies in spades at work. Read the rest here.


I solemnly swear … an HR data and analytics manifesto

May 17, 2016

In the spirit of the election season, I would like to propose a type of nonpartisan party platform for candidates for analytical leader or officer positions within organizations. And even if you aren’t in charge of analytics, these are good principles to live by as someone who has to wrestle with what the analyses in your organization really mean and how best to use them – or ignore them.

1. Diagnosis before action. There should be the equivalent of a Hippocratic oath for people-related data. If doctors have to swear to first do no harm, can’t we ask the same of our data analysts and business leaders? The equivalent oath would go something like this. “I promise to take no actions based on any piece of people-related data without first doing a careful diagnosis of the drivers of individual and organizational behavior, including team dynamics.” Anyone caught violating this part of the manifesto will have to attend a daylong seminar on applying multivariate statistical analyses to social science research questions, which is a much more painful choice … trust me. Read the remaining principles HERE.


Show me the money – and the value of compensation

April 27, 2016

Every leader wants the best people possible working for them. Compensation is the most prominent and costly part of job design that directly impacts the bottom line in multiple ways. So not surprisingly line leaders pay inordinate attention to compensation when trying to maximize margins and performance. Yet there are many aspects of compensation that get lost or glossed over in the search for the perfect pay rate. Before your next heated conversation about how much to pay your people consider the following points. Pay is good for attracting and retaining talent….Read the rest here.


Let ’em eat Pi: Making sense of the HR analytics revolution

March 15, 2016

In honor of Pi Day (March 14), I decided this is a good time to channel Marie Antoinette and take stock of the current state of the HR analytics revolution. Just like with any revolution, the current state of HR analytics appears to have its share of zealous converts, soldiers and civilians, active resisters, and PR that obscures what’s really happening on the front lines. And perhaps the biggest question is whether it’s a genuine revolution that’s truly advancing the “national interests” of the business or a distraction that’s drawing attention away from where the real battles should be waged. Read the rest here.


Benchmarking engagement and spans only is not strategic

February 19, 2016

Key insights:

    • Benchmarking employee engagement, survey data, and spans of control is not strategic
    • You have to embed that data in the larger context of work design and what drives organizational performance to truly understand what’s actionable and where you need more info to drive change in the right direction

Leaders love to benchmark, which is how they evaluate operational performance. So benchmark data play a central role in a lot of analytics carried out both in the business and by HR. Benchmark data on quality, margins, market share, customer satisfaction, and other areas are essential for measuring strategy execution. Read the rest here.


Those contradictory Millennials!

January 28, 2016

Who are Millennials and what do they really want? There are so many stereotypes and caricatures of Millennials, it’s hard to know what’s fact versus fiction.

In Jennifer Deal’s and my new book What Millennials Want From Work we take a look at the complete picture of what defines Millennials and their desires. The book is based on survey data from more than 25,000 Millennials and 29,000 people from other generations in 22 countries.

We find that some of what you’ve heard about Millennials is true – to a certain extent – but that most of the hype is just that: hype. Read the rest here.


Statistical sirens can ruin your business, if you let them lure you onto the rocks

December 1, 2015

Businesses worldwide are in the midst of a data feast and statistical Renaissance. Data scientists are being hired at a rapid clip, the likes of which haven’t been seen since the launch of the Internet and the frenzied search to hire anyone who could do HTML programming and build web sites. Based on reports from the front lines of business analysis, it would appear safe to conclude that the promise of Big Data is being realized daily. But is it?

We certainly have more and more data on where people are at any moment with their cell phones, and how they browse and shop online. Google almost singlehandedly has launched the most recent transformation of the advertising industry toward ever greater data-based decision making. For companies deep in the throes of large-scale transformation of how they interact with customers and learn about their buying patterns, it can feel right now like you are living in the eye of a hurricane: things may be relatively calm at this very instance (meaning you aren’t losing a ton of business to new and emerging business models), but the prospects for calm weather and an easier time making money are a long ways off.

My take on all of this: don’t get swept up in the hype. Read the rest here.


Strategic Analytics is a team sport

November 10, 2015

Right now senior leadership in both the business and in HR is leaving value on the table. We have to end the “business as usual,” nonintegrated way enterprise analytics and human capital analytics are conducted.

The lack of coordination is understandable at first glance. People are very busy: dividing business and HR process management and the accompanying analytics up into separate domains makes it easier to tackle the tasks. That way the leadership of the business and the leadership of HR stick to what they know best, including the analytics needed to monitor and assess progress. But the divide-and-conquer approach is precisely where things go wrong. Read the rest here.


The Dangers of Data Mining

October 20, 2015

HR is becoming more and more data based and analytical. Yet the insights that we’re getting from the data are not increasing as quickly as the rapid proliferation of software tools, seminars, and people with “data scientist” titles. Why is that? A big part of the problem lies in the kinds of analysis we’re doing, with too much emphasis focused on techniques that appear to provide new insights, but which more often than not are a distraction: data mining and linkage analysis.

Data mining. The motivation behind data mining is eminently reasonable: you look for statistically meaningful relationships between measures to inform further analysis. However, data mining is one of the most risky things you can do with HR data. If people are clamoring for insights and you find an interesting relationship in the data, it is tempting to present the results to engage your audience. But presenting interesting relationships is very different from specifying and testing a full causal model. Read the rest here.


Choose Human Capital Substance over HR Style: Evaluate Intent, Not Just the Design

September 26, 2015

In my previous post I argued that HR needs to stop focusing on “best practices” and making its processes world class. A related problem happens when it comes to evaluating how HR is doing, and what criteria should be used. The problem is that HR too often focuses on the programs as designed, not whether they really address what the business needs. Three examples illustrate this point: compensation, leadership development and competency models, and training and development.

Compensation. A key issue in evaluating an HR program is whether you evaluate the program’s design or its intent. For example, merit raises are supposed to motivate people to perform. The design goal of the program is to differentiate compensation based on performance, which is one target measurement. The program’s intent—providing increased motivation to perform—is separate and much more difficult to measure.

Read the rest here.


HR Perfect Processes are the Enemy of What’s Good for the Business

August 21, 2015

(a.k.a. Are You Helping to Improve Strategy Execution Where It’s Most Needed?)

For decades HR has been searching for the right ways to make strategic contributions to the business. I have my own opinions about how HR can do that, some of which are detailed below and in previous posts (for example, on HR scorecards and on measuring ROI). But even more important than what it should do is what it should not do. HR needs to stop obsessing over making HR processes world class.

Now, to be clear, I am not saying that HR should settle for bad policies and practices. But one of the biggest barriers to HR being a true strategic partner is an over-emphasis on HR “best practice.”

There are a thousand things that can be done to fix existing organizational processes and to help people do their jobs better and be more efficient. On the HR side, managers can give better feedback and help their teams to do their work more efficiently. HR can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of recruiting, onboarding, performance management, and training. And so on.

Read the rest here.


The Right Way to Scorecard HR (Don’t Focus on Turnover and Safety)

August 10, 2015

The balanced scorecard has popularized the idea that organizations should regularly measure and monitor key metrics about people. And if there are data available that describe what is going on with the people in your organization, what’s the harm in reporting them? Isn’t more information better than less?

The answer is “yes and no.” Sticking your head in the sand and acting as if there are no data to inform human capital decisions ignores reality. But reporting HR data simply for the sake of sharing is not smart. If you present data without knowing its full value and how to act on it, you will create more problems than you solve. You need a model of what’s driving the behavior you’re observing and why you should care about it.

Consider turnover. What is the “right” level of turnover? In a call center, 50% annual turnover could be a cause for celebration, while 15% turnover for nuclear power plant engineers could be a disaster. The only way to tell the story the right way is to provide further information about the context. Many call centers have annual turnover in excess of 100%, so getting to 50% could be a great achievement. There are a very limited number of nuclear power plants engineers in most countries, so losing even one can create issues for the companies running these plants. If you report only turnover in your scorecard, and don’t embed that information in the larger organizational context, you open the door to people taking action in ways that don’t promote the business’ bottom line.

Read the rest here.


ROI Falls Short for Evaluating Human Capital and HR

July 29, 2015

In my previous post I discussed why ROI falls short as a tool for making business decisions. Here I address why ROI doesn’t live up to the promise it’s supposed to have for evaluating human capital and HR.

HR is often asked to show the ROI of its programs and processes. Think about how this usually plays out. When applied to human capital or HR, ROI is almost always used defensively to justify programs and policies for which there is not enthusiastic support. At the same time, there often is unwavering support for people and processes that key stakeholders “know” are critical for strategic success. So if ROI is not the preferred method for understanding how people and processes contribute to strategic success, what is? And how can organizations better diagnose what levers they need to pull to improve strategy execution and organizational effectiveness?

For example, effective strategy execution often can be improved through better communication about goals and priorities. An HR objective of better communication about goals and priorities can lessen the amount of time needed to complete work processes, which in turn can improve resource use efficiency—a monetary benefit that can be included in ROI. However, the benefits of better communication do not necessarily show up directly and immediately in more efficient use of resources. Instead, more efficient use of resources is often realized only after a significant delay following the improved communication, or in conjunction with other interventions such as team coaching, improved leadership and IT support, or changes in the work design. The benefit of improved communication can be expressed in monetary terms and included in ROI only in the minority of cases where it has an immediate and direct impact on resource efficiency.

Read the rest here.


The ROI Monster Under the Bed

July 15, 2015

Return on investment (ROI) is perhaps the most universally applied tool ever created in the history of finance. It is a standard measurement used to evaluate the financial return from an investment or project.

For all its power, though, ROI is a lot like the monster or bogeyman hiding under the bed that young children fear. It can seem big and scary, even at times all powerful, when we are young. But when we grow up and can see things with a broader perspective, we understand the reality and can put our youthful fears to rest. ROI today is used like a litmus test for HR—if HR cannot show a high enough ROI, then Finance will never approve what HR wants to do. And HR is like the young child fearing the ROI bogeyman under the bed: it doesn’t have the right perspective on the limitations of ROI and what should be done instead.

In my next post I will address why ROI doesn’t live up to the promise it’s supposed to have for evaluating HR. But first here I address why it’s lacking as a tool for making business decisions.

Read the rest here.


Employee Engagement Does Not Cause Performance

March 13, 2015

We know from decades of research and practice that performance leads to job satisfaction. When people are productive, accomplish their objectives, get good feedback on their performance, and are rewarded for being productive, they usually are satisfied with their jobs.

The counter argument – employee engagement causes performance – makes intuitive sense yet does not necessarily hold empirically. The easiest way to make most employees happy is to keep their compensation the same and cut their responsibilities in half. However, doing so would completely destroy profits. Thus employee engagement does not always “cause” improved organizational performance.

Read the rest here.

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Strategic Analytics: Advancing Strategy Execution and Organizational Effectiveness

Strategic Analytics: Advancing Strategy Execution and Organizational Effectiveness

Strategic Analytics coverMore than ever, data drives decisions in organizations—and we have more data, and more ways to analyze it, than ever. Yet strategic initiatives continue to fail as often as they did when computers ran on punch cards. Economist and research scientist Alec Levenson says we need a new approach. 

The problem, Levenson says, is that the business people who devise the strategies and the human resources people who get employees to implement them use completely different analytics. Business analytics can determine if operational priorities aren’t being achieved but can’t explain why. HR analytics reveal potentially helpful policy and process improvements but can’t identify which would have the greatest strategic impact. 

This book shows how to use an integrated approach to bring these two pieces together. Levenson presents a thorough and realistic treatment of the reasons for and challenges of taking an integrated approach. He provides details on the different parts of both enterprise and human capital analytics that have to be conducted for integration to be successful and includes specific questions to ask, along with examples of applying integrated analytics to address particular organizational challenges.

Effective analytics is a team sport. Levenson’s approach allows you to get the deepest insights by bringing people together from both the business and HR perspectives to assess what’s going on and determine the right solution.

ORDER Strategic Analytics: Advancing Strategy Execution and Organizational Effectiveness at Amazon.

Alec Levenson discusses using analytics strategically in HR.


Endorsements

Too many senior executives and HR professionals hide behind a lack of data or incorrectly use data as an absolute decision maker. Strategic Analytics provides a straightforward approach to analyze the right areas to achieve long term impact.
Jeff Joerres, Executive Chairman, ManpowerGroup

Levenson breaks analysis down into a step by step process – showing how to capture data and truly implement analytics in organizations, creating capabilities that drive strategy execution and, ultimately, competitive advantage. A must-read for H.R. professionals who want to build strategic partnerships and drive game changing results.
—Michael Johnson, Chief Human Resources Officer, UPS

Informed business and HR leaders know how important it is to connect business and talent outcomes.  They appreciate the need for art and science, but rarely have the methodology or tools to make the science real.  Strategic Analytics helps solve this problem, providing insight on applying big data and analytics to unlock value for leaders and for organizations.
Scott Pitasky, Executive Vice President and Chief Partner Resource Officer, Starbucks

In this fascinating book, Dr. Levenson shows how leaders can make fast and accurate decisions in a world that is ever more complex, addressing the half-truths and unsubstantiated claims that abound in many corporations. A must read for anyone determined to improve their decision making.
—Lynda Gratton, Professor of Management Practice, London Business School

Strategic Analytics addresses one of the key complaints about HR today – that the function is not aligned with driving the business strategy.  Levenson gives a step-by-step approach for leveraging analytics to identify the right levers to drive business strategy and organizational effectiveness. The book is both comprehensive and pragmatic, with thoughtful examples to help HR and business leaders alike.
—Tracy Faber, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, McKesson

Strategic Analytics starts in the right place – winning in the marketplace – and assesses integrated solutions that will outlast individuals.  A wonderful book of useful frameworks and tools.
—Dave Ulrich, Rensis Likert Professor of Business Administration, University of Michigan, and partner, The RBL Group

A real breakthrough. Strategic Analytics is a must read for line and human resource executives who strive to make their organization and human resource system a source of strategic advantage. The systemic framework for rigorous diagnosis of organization alignment problems will help executives avoid simple but wrong responses that undermine effective strategy execution.
—Michael Beer, Professor Emeritus, Harvard Business School, and Co-founder TruePoint

Levenson offers a highly useful framework for sharpening the focus of data analytics within large, complex organizations.  This book cuts through much of the hype surrounding the topic with a pragmatic review of methods that will generate actionable insights within an enterprise.  Strategic Analytics should redirect efforts commonly seen today that often generate large quantities of data without really impacting business results.
—Alan May, Executive Vice President, Human Resources, Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Do you ever feel like you have all the data in the world but still don’t know how to use it or you’re not sure which analytics to use?   So many practitioners don’t solve their organizational issues because analytics without strategy are useless, or their strategies aren’t aligned organizationally so the analytics don’t matter.  In this essential book, Levenson provides meaningful, actionable insights for business leaders and HR practitioners to align strategies and priorities to improve organizational effectiveness AND drive bottom line results.
—Kim Warmbier, Executive Vice President, Human Resources, Dean Foods

Strategic Analytics is a must for executives, line managers and HR practitioners seeking to advance analytics of human capital management and understand which interventions will drive tighter linkages between business strategy and execution.
—Patrick McLaughlin, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, Frito-Lay North America, PepsiCo, Inc.

Strategic Analytics is the book we have been waiting for. Levenson provides a roadmap to analyze performance gaps in strategy execution and the causal linkage with how the organization is designed and managed.  He shows the role high performance work design plays in strategy execution, which is the key design area in the new digital modern organization.  This book puts all the pieces together to provide a clear analytic approach to improve organizational effectiveness.
—Stu Winby, CEO, SPRING Network

Getting people and practices aligned to achieve strategy is one of the biggest stumbling blocks in modern management, often made worse by conflicting messages coming from workplace metrics and overall business metrics.  Strategic Analytics offers practical advice on how to straighten out those different measures.  New and much needed guidance for getting strategy execution right.
—Peter Cappelli, Director, Center for Human Resources, Wharton School of Business

Strategic Analytics is a great roadmap for the journey from big data and big confusion to focused and practical sense-making through better business insights. Levenson provides a user-friendly approach for what to analyze, why to analyze it, and how to make more powerful business decisions as a result.
—Ian Ziskin, President, EXec EXcel Group LLC and former Chief Human Resources Officer, Northrop Grumman

Levenson nails the essence of successful analytics work with the statement that “effective analytics is a team sport”.  Up to now analysis in organizations has been a suboptimized, multi-headed monster with each head eating alone.  Strategic Analytics shows how to effectively use a holistic integrated approach.
—Jac Fitz-enz, CEO Human Capital Source

What Millennials Want from Work

What Millennials Want from Work: How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce

WhatMillennialsWant_cover

Millennials are the future of your business. How can managers and leaders of organizations better engage them to gain a competitive advantage?

Millennials have been burdened with a reputation as spoiled, lazy, and entitled, but the reality behind the stereotype is far richer and more complex. Who are Millennials and what do they really want?

This essential book explains who Millennials really are, and offers practical advice to help those who manage, lead, and work with Millennials to improve teamwork, increase productivity, strengthen organizational culture, and build a robust talent pipeline.

Based on fieldwork and survey data from global research on more than 25,000 Millennials and 29,000 older workers in 22 countries, this book paints a comprehensive, scientifically accurate picture of what really motivates Millennials around the world.

Learn how to get the most from Millennials by:

  • Improving workplace flexibility—because Millennials don’t separate life and work
  • Providing adequate support and feedback—because Millennials like to learn and grow
  • Coaching, not micromanaging—because Millennials value autonomy
  • Designing competitive salary structures—because Millennials know what’s up
  • Providing opportunities to contribute to society—because Millennials care about doing good

Millennials want a satisfying job that pays well, coworkers they like and trust, advancement opportunities, and the occasional pat on the back. Who doesn’t want those things?

ORDER What Millennials Want from Work: How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce at Amazon.


Endorsements

The workforce of today is more diverse, complex and challenging than ever before. Over the next 10 years organizations big and small may succeed or fail based on how they embrace the Millennial generation. This book provides valuable insights and tools that can help us understand what’s inside this cohort and how we can unlock their unique value.
– Scott Pitasky, Executive Vice President and Chief Partner Resource Officer, Starbucks

If you think you understand the Millennials in your life, think again. In this new generational research, Deal and Levenson offer some new twists on what Millennials want, think, and do, and how organizations can maximize their engagement and contribution. As a Millennial manager, parent, and talent practitioner, the global perspective and practical recommendations in Millennials have already influenced my thinking.
– Mary Eckenrod, VP, Global Talent Management, Johnson Controls

This book will help you reinvent the way you inspire and connect with Millennials. Anyone looking to truly understand this exciting and complex generation will benefit from Deal and Levenson’s ability to resolve seemingly contradictory paradoxes. Think of it as a generational decoder key, giving you simple secrets to deeply engage and bring out the best of Millennials’ passion to constantly learn, grow and make a meaningful difference.
– Eva Sage Gavin, Vice Chair, Skills for America’s Future, The Aspen Institute; Senior Advisor, Boston Consulting Group; former EVP, Human Resources and Corporate Affairs, Gap Inc.

This is an outstanding resource that you can use right now to engage Millennials and propel your business forward. Deal and Levenson provide an incredibly rich, practical picture of what really drives Millennials and how to engage, lead, and work with them to mutually benefit your bottom line. What Millennials Want from Work will help you win the war for the talent you need for innovation and long-term growth.
– Steve Milovich, Senior Vice President Global Human Resources, Disney ABC Television, The Walt Disney Company

Organizations everywhere can benefit from the sharp insights shared in What Millennials Want From Work. Debunking common misconceptions, Deal and Levenson provide useful tips for leaders, managers, and co-workers on how to engage and motivate Millennials. They are the future of our workplace, and this book will help everyone who works with Millennials leverage the best they have to offer.
– Anne Hill, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, Avery Dennison

The state-of-the-art guide to managing and working with Millennials. Based on their extensive research with organizations around the world, Deal and Levenson resolve the debates about whether Millennials are entitled or hardworking, needy or independent, high-tech or high-touch, and disloyal or committed. This data-driven book is full of practical recommendations.
– Adam Grant, Wharton professor and New York Times bestselling author of GIVE AND TAKE and ORIGINALS

Most pundits treat Millennials like they are a completely different species, relying on anecdotes and trite commentary. Deal and Levenson take a different approach, using scientific analysis to provide data-based insights and separate myth from the real changes happening in our society. The disparity across countries is particularly enlightening. Not only does culture eat strategy for lunch, apparently generational-generalities are an appetizer!
– Tony Sarsam, Chief Executive Officer, Ready Pac Foods

To understand the future we must know what drives Millennials, the generation that will lead and shape the next phase of the world’s history. This book is an excellent resource, packed with real insights and practical recommendations that are guaranteed to be of high value to all leaders, boardrooms, governments, marketers, educators and parents alike.
– Dennis Finn, Global CEO, Advisian

What Millenials Want from Work is for all leaders who want to “future proof” their talent management skills and strategy. Deal and Levenson have taken their thorough, global research to create a cogent handbook for successfully leading and managing our next generation of talent. The messages are clear, the advice is practical and the bottom line is inspiring. The choice for current leaders is critical and could define our legacy. We can either nurture and catalyse this dynamic, or be disrupted by it; as this new cohort emerges to lead the next generation of talent.
– Jonathan Donner, Vice President Global Learning and Capability Development, Unilever

Just about everyone has opinions on the Millennials in our work force. But exceptional research that helps us understand what really makes this generation tick has been lacking – until now. Deal and Levenson perform a great service for senior executives everywhere, replacing myths with fresh, candid insights that will help organizations unlock the full potential of their emerging talent.
– John D. Butler, former Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resource Officer, Textron Inc.

Deal and Levenson have comprehensively separated fact from urban myth when it comes to what Millennials want from work. A must read for anyone interested in ensuring their organization is maximizing execution through higher levels of Millennial engagement and commitment.
– Mark Blankenship, Executive Vice President, Chief People, Culture & Corporate Strategy Officer, Jack in the Box

With rich data and storytelling, Deal and Levenson show us something that we did not know conclusively until now: Millennials are often driven by similar passions and goals, no matter where they live and work in the world. How can global organizations harness their talent? This book offers the smart, practical advice we need to build outstanding leadership pipelines in every corner of the globe.
– Ingar Skaug, Retired President and Group Chief Executive Officer, Wilh. Wilhelmsen ASA

Millennials are our future. If you manage Millennials, or if you are one, read Deal and Levenson’s guide to understanding this unique generation. Based on critical global research, this book describes what motivates them and how to adjust your thinking and management style to bring out the best in your whole team!
– Marshall Goldsmith author or editor of 35 books including the NYT#1 bestselling Triggers and global bestsellers MOJO and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

Millennials are smart, talented and ambitious – and often misunderstood by those of us responsible for developing them. The authors have delivered the kind of engaging, data-driven study about this generation that we’ve needed for years. With strong analysis and step-by-step guidance, this book will make the conversations that organizations have about cultivating their future leaders far more productive.
– Martin Schneider, Vice President and Global CIO, VF Corporation

The authors take us on a captivating trip around the world, exploring the many ways in which Millennials are the same and also the fewer but crucial ways in which they differ culturally. For organizations that are truly serious about leveraging world-class research to develop a new generation of global leaders, this book needs to be read now.
– Om Bhatt, Former Chairman, State Bank of India

Deal and Levenson have done us all a great service. They unpack in a clear and considered way What Millennials Want from Work and provide thoughtful and useful tools for engaging this cohort of workers. The greater service is that this is really a book about how to manage anyone in your workforce: Baby Boomers, Gen Y, any generation. Deal and Levenson help us think more holistically about the people who are in our organizations, showing how to get the most out of diverse teams and ensure everyone is included and motivated.
– Laura Liswood, Secretary General, Council of Women World Leaders; Senior Advisor, Goldman Sachs; Author, The Loudest Duck: Moving Beyond Diversity (Wiley & Sons)

Deal and Levenson provide profound insights into who Millennials are, what they want, and how they are different culturally around the world. Understanding Millennials is essential to any corporation that wants to succeed both locally and globally. This book provides the guidance and advice on how to manage Millennials your organization needs to grow sustainably.
– Anne Patricia Sutanto, Vice CEO of PT. Pan Brothers Tbk

Global organizations know that culture can make or break a business model. Today’s Millennial generation represents one of the largest cultural challenges, one that can be a catalyst for success, or a barrier to realizing global ambitions. Deal and Levenson provide a masterful guide to understanding how much Millennials are driven by similar passions and desires worldwide, and where cultural differences really matter.
– Nenad Pacek, Founder and President, Global Success Advisors GmbH, Co-founder and Co-CEO, CEEMEA Business Group

A successful strategy of winning with your customers starts with engaging your own staff. This practical and insightful guide shows how to win with your Millennial staff, and what drives their behavior and decisions. A useful – and fun – read for all leaders who want their organizations to remain relevant and competitive.
– Raimund Snyders, CEO, Mutual & Federal

Leading an Indian owned business in a mature industry in a mature region – steel in Europe – I see both the power of Millennials and their impact in the Indian economy. Millennials have the potential to both accelerate the next phase of development of the world’s emerging markets, and redesign the future of manufacturing excellence in Europe and throughout the world’s mature markets. Deal and Levenson provide a clear road map to follow for leaders who want to enable Millennials’ contribution to transform the future.
– Dr. Karl Köhler, CEO and Managing Director, Tata Steel – Europe

This book by Deal and Levenson is a must read for business leaders and HR professionals who want to meet the challenges of attracting, retaining and rewarding Millennials at work.
–Jacqueline Yew, SVP Organizational Strategy and Leadership Development, Pactera Technology International Limited

Coming in January 2016

What Millennials Want from Work: How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce

WhatMillennialsWant_cover


The most comprehensive, in-depth look at Millennials to date―essential for managers, HR professionals, and global business leaders seeking to align long-term organizational goals with the realities of the new workforce

What Millennials Want from Work explains how to design talent, engagement, and retention strategies that will successfully attract, manage, develop, and retain the young workers companies need for sustainable growth.

Drawing on fieldwork and data from global research including more than 25,000 Millennial respondents, the book reveals how Millennials really operate, what they really want, and what really motivates them. It offers tactics and strategies for using this information to increase productivity, strengthen organizations, build robust talent pipelines, and gain a competitive advantage. Learn how to get the most from Millennials by:

  • Improving workplace flexibility
  • Providing adequate support and feedback
  • Coaching, not micromanaging
  • Designing competitive salary structures
  • Providing opportunities to contribute to society
  • Developing a culture that fosters collaboration

PRE-ORDER What Millennials Want from Work: How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce at Amazon.

 

 

Talent Management

Work Redesign Pilot Evaluation for Large Consumer Products Company

  • Accomplishments: Measured the behavioral and productivity impacts of a work design change that created new roles and interdependent teams in customer-facing settings.
  • Key insights: Before-and-after measurement of customer impacts, and linkage to both internal group dynamics and change management effectiveness.

Global Intergenerational Management for Multinational Professional Services Firm 

  • Accomplishments: Most comprehensive scientific evaluation of the drivers of retention and engagement for the new versus older generations of workers.  Data collected from over 40,000 people in 19 countries worldwide.
  • Key insight: Separating myth versus reality for how organizations need to change to adapt to the new generation, how the new generation needs to adapt to the world of work, and which management practices are going to have the biggest impact.

Talent Management Optimization for Multinational Company’s Operation in China

  • Accomplishments: Assessed hiring profile for key frontline talent roles, and the career development and talent management systems needed to improve retention, motivation and productivity. The company used the results to restructure recruiting, training and development.
  • Key insight: How to tradeoff building capability for profitability today versus market share and strategic success in the long run in a rapidly expanding emerging market.

Human Capital Value for Large Multinational Professional Services Firm

  • Accomplishments: Identified labor market return to skills developed on the job. Identified job design elements driving motivation, productivity and turnover for critical talent pools. Company used the results to change the work system and lower turnover.
  • Longitudinal component: Repeated the study design seven years later to measure changes in the factors driving motivation and engagement for the Millennial Generation versus Generation X.
  • Key insights: The monetary and career development value which professional employees and their managers derive from a job. The role of job factors versus compensation as drivers of retention. Management techniques and processes for managing the new generation of workers.

Role Optimization 

  • Accomplishments: Assessed role design and business unit structure for multiple layers of management for third largest pineapple plantation in the world.
  • Key insight: How to structure roles, responsibilities, competencies and organizational processes to increase efficiency of decision making and organizational effectiveness.

Compensation Pilot Evaluation for Large Multinational

  • Accomplishments: Designed measurement framework to evaluate new sales compensation program, identifying the drivers of and barriers to increased sales. Company used the results to optimize the compensation program and evaluate whether to institutionalize it.
  • Key insights: Deep understanding of the role of compensation in driving behavior that is aligned with the company’s strategic objectives.

High Performance Teams for Multinational Professional Services Firm

  • Accomplishments: Identified levers with greatest impact for improving business unit effectiveness. Company used the results to optimize team performance.
  • Key insights: Organization and job design choices can have very different impacts on business unit, client and employee outcomes. Interdependencies between business unit, client and individual factors can amplify the importance of policies and processes designed to improve performance.

Maximizing Route Sales Effectiveness for Multinational Foods Company

  • Accomplishments: Identified job components that contributed differentially to the bottom line, which the company used to redesign the role, better target customer segments, improve performance, and increase compensation.
  • Key insights: Deep understanding of the drivers of performance and motivation in a frontline role that is critical for the organization’s success.

Career Paths of Temp Workers for a Leading Temporary Staffing Agency

  • Sponsored by Russell Sage Foundation and Rockefeller Foundation
  • Accomplishments: Company used the results to improve career paths for temps. Results also used to evaluate public policy implications of national growth in temp employment.
  • Key insights: The roles that temporary workers play vis-à-vis non-temporary workers in firms’ human capital strategies.

Organization Design & Effectiveness

Measuring the Impact of an Operating System Model Change for Global Company

  • Accomplishments: Measured the extent of process and cultural change in a large global company that changed its operating model away from decentralized decision making, including introducing stronger central functions and centers of excellence
  • Key insight: Using behavioral and business measurements to evaluate the bottom line impact of an operating model change.

Work Redesign Pilot Evaluation for Large Consumer Products Company

  • Accomplishments: Measured the behavioral and productivity impacts of a work design change that created new roles and interdependent teams in customer-facing settings.
  • Key insights: Before-and-after measurement of customer impacts, and linkage to both internal group dynamics and change management effectiveness.

Customer Teams Optimization for Large Consumer Products Organization

  • Accomplishments: Designed organization diagnosis framework to evaluate the organization design for division-spanning sales teams that serve the company’s largest customers. The company used the results to restructure the teams and their support systems to improve performance.
  • Key insight: Ways to optimize customer-facing teams that are embedded in matrix structure that crosses divisions.

Merger Integration Evaluation for Chinese Engineering Firm 

  • Accomplishments: Evaluated merger that created company subsidiary.
  • Key insight: Identified areas for improvement in management practices and talent management.

Decision Making Optimization for Global Pharmaceuticals Company

  • Accomplishments: Designed organization diagnosis framework to evaluate the structure of decision making and decision rights throughout the organization and across all functions and divisions globally. The company used the results to clarify roles and responsibilities, realign decision making processes, and improve two-way communication throughout the corporate structure.
  • Key insight: How to achieve the right balance between top-down vs. bottom-up and center-led vs. geographically dispersed decision making.

How Companies Achieve Success in Times of Adversity for Global Management Consulting Firm

  • Accomplishments: Identified organizational structures and processes that companies adopt in good times that enable them to weather both macroeconomic and industry tough times.
  • Key insights: How companies translate strategy into decisions about restructuring, growing and/or eliminating work and lines of business that enable corporate survival and growth in difficult economic environments.

Human Capital Analytics

Global Intergenerational Management for Multinational Professional Services Firm

  • Accomplishments: Most comprehensive scientific evaluation of the drivers of retention and engagement for the new versus older generations of workers.  Data collected from over 40,000 people in 19 countries worldwide.
  • Key insight: Separating myth versus reality for how organizations need to change to adapt to the new generation, how the new generation needs to adapt to the world of work, and which management practices are going to have the biggest impact

Work Redesign Pilot Evaluation for Large Consumer Products Company

  • Accomplishments: Measured the behavioral and productivity impacts of a work design change that created new roles and interdependent teams in customer-facing settings.
  • Key insights: Before-and-after measurement of customer impacts, and linkage to both internal group dynamics and change management effectiveness.

Measuring the Business Impact of Executive Coaching 

  • Accomplishments: Developed model for measuring and improving the business impact of executive coaching.
  • Key insights: Executives’ contribution to business performance often depends on the unique application of their own skills in combination with the actions of people on their team and throughout the organization.

Category Management Optimization for Multinational Food and Beverage Corporation

  • Accomplishments: Designed organization diagnosis framework to evaluate the job and organization design for roles that provide key analytic support for sales.
  • Key insights: The value that functional support roles play in driving bottom line performance, and paths to maximizing that value.

Compensation Pilot Evaluation for a Large Food Products Organization

  • Accomplishments: Designed measurement framework to evaluate new sales compensation program, identifying the drivers of and barriers to increased sales. Company used the results to optimize the compensation program and evaluate whether to institutionalize it.
  • Key insights: Deep understanding of the role of compensation in driving behavior that is aligned with the company’s strategic objectives.

Helped Design and Train Human Capital Analytics Group for a Large Canadian Financial Institution

  • Accomplishments: Consulted on the design, mission and processes of new analytics group focused on employee behaviors. Designed measurement models for analysts and provided coaching on their implementation and interpretation.
  • Key insights: Organizations’ ability to fully capitalize on their employees’ data often requires the building of significant analytical capabilities both internally and externally.

Linking Managerial Competencies to the Bottom Line for a Large Food Products Organization

  • Accomplishments: Created measurements to demonstrate bottom-line impact of managerial competency system. Company used the results to validate the design of the competency system.
  • Key insights: Managerial competency systems that evaluate, develop and reward specific skills that are essential for organizational performance and effectiveness can contribute directly to the bottom line.

ROI of Investing in Basic Skills 

  • Sponsored by National Institute for Literacy
  • Accomplishments: Analyzed company-funded basic skills remedial training programs to determine the ROI of companies filling in gaps left by the primary and secondary education systems. Results used to challenge conventional buy vs. build approach to managing basic skills in companies’ human capital strategies.
  • Key insights: Companies can capture the ROI from investing in workers’ basic skills by paying close attention to how the services are designed and delivered, and to their employees’ career development needs.

 

Global Work and Emerging Markets

Measuring the Impact of an Operating System Model Change for Global Company

  • Accomplishments: Measured the extent of process and cultural change in a large global company that changed its operating model away from decentralized decision making, including introducing stronger central functions and centers of excellence
  • Key insight: Using behavioral and business measurements to evaluate the bottom line impact of an operating model change.

Decision Making Optimization for Global Pharmaceuticals Company

  • Accomplishments:  Designed organization diagnosis framework to evaluate the structure of decision making and decision rights throughout the organization and across all functions and divisions globally. The company used the results to clarify roles and responsibilities, realign decision making processes, and improve two-way communication throughout the corporate structure.
  • Key insightHow to achieve the right balance between top-down vs. bottom-up and center-led vs. geographically dispersed decision making.

Talent Management Optimization for Multinational Company’s Operation in China

  • Accomplishments: Assessed hiring profile for key frontline talent roles, and the career development and talent management systems needed to improve retention, motivation and productivity. The company used the results to restructure recruiting, training and development.
  • Key insight: How to tradeoff building capability for profitability today versus market share and strategic success in the long run in a rapidly expanding emerging market.

Role Optimization for Indonesian Conglomerate

  • Accomplishments: Assessed role design and business unit structure for multiple layers of management for third largest pineapple plantation in the world.
  • Key insight: How to structure roles, responsibilities, competencies and organizational processes to increase efficiency of decision making and organizational effectiveness.

Global Intergenerational Management for Multinational Professional Services Firm 

  • Accomplishments: Most comprehensive scientific evaluation of the drivers of retention and engagement for the new versus older generations of workers.  Data collected from over 40,000 people in 19 countries worldwide.
  • Key insight: Separating myth versus reality for how organizations need to change to adapt to the new generation, how the new generation needs to adapt to the world of work, and which management practices are going to have the biggest impact.

Merger Integration Evaluation for Chinese Engineering Firm

  • Accomplishments: Evaluated merger that created a subsidiary.
  • Key insight: Identified areas for improvement in management practices and talent management.

Productivity of Globally Distributed Software Development for Fortune 200 Technology Company

  • Sponsored by Sloan Foundation
  • Accomplishments: Company used the results to evaluate cost-benefits of moving software development to lower cost labor markets worldwide.
  • Key insights: Salary costs comparisons alone are insufficient to manage the ROI of spreading work around the globe. The costs and benefits of differentiating and integrating work across time and space are just as important and may dominate labor cost differences.

Speaking

Alec Levenson regularly makes presentations and leads executive education workshops. He has trained professionals from a broad range of Fortune 500 and Global 500 companies in human capital analytics. Below is a selection of Alec’s events.


RECENT EVENTS

Workshop – Analytics and Design for High Performance

San Jose (hosted by Flex)
Jan 17-19, 2018 (two days total: started at noon on 1/17 and ended at 1pm on 1/19)
with Alec Levenson (Senior Research Scientist, CEO) and Alexis Fink (General Manager, Talent Intelligence Analytics, Intel)
Analytics and Design for High Performance Workshop Agenda

This program addressed two major trends in companies today: the rapid growth and evolution of analytics, and the ever-increasing emphasis on organizational performance.

Analytics has exploded in recent years. On the customer side, social media, product digitization, location services, AI, the Internet of Things and more are creating a true revolution and fundamental organizational change. On the employee side, the rapid growth in workforce analytics expertise promises to deliver new insight into the drivers of motivation and productivity. Yet the depth of insights on people and talent has fallen far short of potential.

Rather than lead with analytics, we need to increase the depth of insights on people and talent by focusing on the right problems to solve and the right tools needed to solve them, including critical fundamental skills like high performance work design.

In this workshop, Alec Levenson and Alexis Fink showed how to use analytics and work design tools to improve job, team and organizational performance.

Workshop – Strategic HR Analytics Workshop, San Francisco, California

May 10-12, 2017. Featured speaker.

HR analytics is at a crossroads today. We have at our fingertips access to the most powerful computers, the largest databases on organizational processes, and ever-expanding information on consumer behavior and the way commerce is conducted worldwide. The number of HR analytics articles, surveys and events proliferates while the depth of insights aren’t keeping pace. Organizations struggle as much as ever to achieve strategic objectives while HR strives to make effective decisions when dealing with tight budgets and competing business priorities.

Alexis Fink and I led a learning program on May 10-12 in San Francisco on Strategic Analytics that provided tools and skill building to close the gaps. We showed how to use analytics to make better strategic decisions and be a stronger business partner and leader. Participants learned how to:

  • Bring together the business and HR to effectively identify and solve systematic talent and business challenges
  • Analyze and decide when to focus on improving current HR practice, and when to rethink how everything fits together to support the business
  • Determine whether you can rely on the data you have at hand in your HR systems to make strategic decisions, or go out and collect different information
  • Identity where to find additional sources of data where needed
  • Forge your own path when benchmarks would lead you astray
  • Integrate analytics and influencing to get results

Specific examples from the participants’ current business, human capital and analytics challenges were used throughout the workshop to demonstrate how to apply the Strategic Analytics approach, and determine what to do and what not to do. Whether you are a business leader, HR professional, or analyst, the workshop helped participants make better business and human capital decisions, and direct the analytics conducted in your organization for more actionable insights.

Alexis and I jointly led the workshop, combining our 35 plus years of working and consulting with organizations on how to optimize integrated talent management systems, total rewards, leadership and talent development, competency systems, HR and predictive analytics, strategic workforce planning, spans of control, team dynamics, organizational design, and matrix-based decision making processes.

The workshop provides participants with models and a process for conducting analytics that support improved organizational effectiveness and strategy execution. It incorporates the enterprise approach used by senior business leaders, and the human capital approach used by HR and frontline managers, which are usually applied separately and fail to find the root causes of organizational problems. The workshop shows how to integrate them for a comprehensive, systems approach to diagnosing the sources of strategy execution failure. The insights have direct implications for enterprise investment that can be used to inform annual planning and budgeting decisions.

Individuals and teams interested in using data and analytics to improve organization effectiveness and strategy execution should consider attending future iterations of this workshop. It is appropriate for HR professionals, analytics experts, function and unit leaders, line managers, and others involved with diagnosing and improving organizational effectiveness and strategy execution.

 

Workshop – Strategic Analytics: Leverage Analytics to Improve Business Results and Organization Effectiveness

bullseye
Los Angeles, May 17-19, 2016 (two days total: starts at 1 pm on 5/17 and ends around lunchtime on 5/19)

with Alec Levenson (Senior Research Scientist, CEO) and guest speaker Bernard Bedon (Vice President, HR, Amgen). Hosted by Capital Group.

HR analytics and business analytics are at a crossroads today. We have at our fingertips access to the most powerful computers, the largest databases on organizational processes, and ever-expanding information on consumer behavior and the way commerce is conducted worldwide. Yet organizations struggle as much as ever to achieve strategic objectives and improve organizational effectiveness.

Whether you are a business leader, HR professional, or analyst, the workshop will help you make better business and human capital decisions, and direct the analytics conducted in your organization for more actionable insights. The workshop includes specific guidance on what to do and what not to do. 

 

Workshop – Organization Effectiveness Analytics: Leverage Analytics to Improve Strategy Execution

January 27-29, 2015 (two days total: starts at 1 pm on 1/27 and ends around lunchtime on 1/29)

Leverage analytics to improve insights and impact. Organizations are most effective when they successfully execute the business strategy and accomplish the business objectives, yet strategy execution is a fundamental weakness across all industries. Leaders struggle with execution and organization effectiveness in most cases because there are insufficient analytics to diagnose where improvements need to be made.


Webinars, Webcasts and Radio

Tucana People Analytics Podcast

May 1, 2017. Alec is interviewed on the Tucana People Analytics Podcast. Listen to the podcast here (courtesy TPAP).

Talent10X

(Scroll down to click on the link to listen.) Alec discusses the impact of teams and high-performance work design.

Radio Interview – KGNU’s “It’s the Economy” program

January 14, 2016. Alec is interviewed by KGNU’s Claudia Cragg about millennials and his new book, What Millennials Want from Work (2016). LISTEN to the entire interview here (courtesy KGNU).

Strategic Analytics

December 1, 2015. This webinar aligned with Alec Levenson’s new book, Strategic Analytics: Advancing Strategy Execution and Organizational Effectiveness. He took a dive into some of the themes in the book and answered questions from participants. Watch a replay of the webinar here.

The New Frontier of Analytics: Going Beyond Data and ROI

December 2, 2014, 9-10 am (PT). HR and human capital analytics in organizations today are providing more and more insights into patterns of employee behavior and talent management that previously seemed “hidden” in data that hadn’t been fully analyzed. Yet the growing number of data-based facts that are emerging about what takes place in organizations falls short of what is needed to maximize strategy execution and organization effectiveness…. Click to learn more.


Speaking Engagements

Corporate Research Forum, London, UK

November 7, 2017. Keynote speaker on HR analytics.

Corporate Research Forum, Paris, France

November 9, 2017. Keynote speaker on HR analytics.

People Analytics World, London, UK

April 25-26, 2017. Keynote speaker.

HRPS New Jersey

March 2, 2017. Keynote speaker at the event.

Society of Consulting Psychology Conference, Seattle, Washington

February 10, 2017. Alec and Jennifer Deal delivered a keynote address on “What Millennials Want From Work.”

CHO Group, Phoenix, Arizona

October 26, 2016. Alec Levenson discussed “What Millennials Want From Work: How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce.”

ATD Webcast

October 25, 2016. Alec spoke on “Maximizing the Value of Talent Management.”

SHRM Thought Leaders Retreat, Seattle, Washington

September 26, 2016. Alec spoke at the retreat on “Using Workforce Analytics for Competitive Advantage.”

HR Executive Summit, Shanghai, China

June 2-4, 2016.  Alec made a keynote speech and led a workshop on Strategic Analytics at this summit.

G100 Talent Consortium, New York City

April 14, 2016. Alec and  Jennifer Deal spoke about their new book, What Millennials Want From Work.

People Analytics Conference, Minneapolis

March 24, 2016. Alec presented a keynote address on Strategic People Analytics.

Deploying Strategic Analytics to Maximize HR’s Impact

Presenter at NYHRPS, New York, March 16, 2016. Alec Levenson presented a new, unified way of addressing both business and HR challenges, using integrated analytics. His framework can be used to address any pressing business or talent issue to improve strategy execution and organizational effectiveness, and does not require a degree in advanced statistics to implement. Designed for both generalists and analysts, the framework has been successfully applied to unearth solutions to challenging business performance across a wide range of industries and business contexts.

Using Strategic Analytics to Maximize Workforce Engagement and the Bottom Line

Speaker at the WorldAtWork Future of Work Forum, New Orleans, March 8, 2016. L Alec Levenson introduced  a step-by-step approach for structuring analytics to get to strategic insight with minimum effort. 

Learning Analytics for Impact

vSession presenter at ATD Forum, October 2015.

Building Your HR Strategy and Decision Making to Improve Performance 

SHRM Workforce Strategies Conference keynote speaker, San Diego, September 2015. 

Integrating Business and Human Capital Analytics for Strategic Insights

Featured speaker at CHO Group, Seattle, May 27, 2015.  Alec Levenson presented a comprehensive approach to conducting enterprise and human capital analytics in an integrated way to maximize both organizational capability and bottom line impact. 

Tying Together Human Capital Analytics and Business Strategy Execution to Truly Impact the Entire Enterprise

Keynote address at TMA Human Capital Analytics Summit, Miami, February 23, 2015. In order to be truly strategic in our impact on the organization, we need a comprehensive understanding of the effectiveness of evidence based decision-making and the role that human capital analytics plays relative to other HR programs and the business initiatives. Systems diagnosis coupled with human capital analysis provide the right framework for understanding what levers HR can pull that contribute to the bottom line, and where it needs to be integrated with other efforts for maximum impact.

Using Social Media Platforms to Promote Innovation and Better Product Marketing Decisions

Keynote address at TMA Marketing and Sales Analytics Summit, Miami, February 24, 2015. As part of a larger study on organizational innovation and new technologies, Alec will hone in on how leading companies are using social media platforms with their marketing and strategy leaders to drive innovation. He will highlight examples of engagement with both external and internal stakeholders to broaden the data available for making the right marketing decisions in product design, prototyping and delivery.

 


Videos

Mistakes working with workforce analytics data]

Advice to HR professionals on working with analytics.

Alec Levenson discusses using analytics strategically in HR.

Alec Levenson speaks on integrating business strategy analytics and human capital analytics.

Alec Levenson discusses practical workforce planning through human capital analytics and organizational effectiveness.

Everyone is doing employee surveys, but how does employee engagement relate to the goals of the organization?

Alec Levenson talks about surveys and survey fatigue.

This video series is from Bellevue University’s Human Capital Lab presentation that Alec Levenson gave on Measuring and Increasing the Impact of Learning and Organizational Development.


A Selection of Executive Education Programs, Speaking Engagements, and Webinars

Topics:

  • Organization Design and Talent Strategies for Emerging Markets
  • Leadership Development in Pacific Rim Firms
  • The Promise and Realities of Emerging Markets
  • Global Talent Management for Japanese Companies in Developed and Emerging Markets
  • Managing the Millennials
  • Achieving High Performance through Organization Design
  • Strategic HR Transformation & Future of HR
  • Targeted Analytics: Improving Organizational and Talent Decisions
  • Strategy Execution and Investment Analytics
  • HR Analytics and Strategic Thinking
  • The Promise of Big Data for HR: Old Wine and New Frontiers
  • Using HR Analytics for Modeling and Making Sense of Compensation
  • Workforce Planning: Strategic Analytics
  • Maximizing the Return on Your Survey and Analytics Work
  • Workforce Sensing and Analytics
  • Aligning Strategic Metrics to the Overall Business Goals
  • Using Change Management and Measurement to Make an Impact
  • Maximizing the Return on Your Survey and Measurement Work

Sample Audiences:

  • UPS Global HR Meeting
  • McKesson
  • SK (Korea) HR Development Program
  • Exelon
  • Gilead
  • DIRECTV Global HR Meeting
  • Microsoft Global HR Meeting
  • Boeing
  • EQUATE Petrochemical (Kuwait)
  • Dow Chemical
  • Center for Effective Organizations Sponsors Meeting
  • Singapore Public Service Division
  • Sinopec Nanjing Engineering Inc.
  • American Chamber of Commerce Shanghai
  • Academy of Management
  • REITI Japanese Personnel Management Symposium
  • Society of Labor Economists
  • Nanjing University Business School
  • International Association of Chinese Management Research
  • Bay Area Executive Development Network
  • The Conference Board
  • Talent Management Alliance
  • IQPC
  • i4CP
  • Human Capital Institute